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The Sinister Beauty of Carnivorous Plants

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The Sinister Beauty of Carnivorous Plants

Matthew M. Kaelin

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$34.99

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The alluring nature of carnivorous plants is on stunning display in this fine art-style collection of botanical photographs. Over 140 color images show in minute detail species, hybrids, and cultivars from around the world, many painstakingly cultivated by the author in his native New York. The images were taken in a studio setting as well as in their natural environment. Detailed captions and text contain horticultural information like genus, specie, and common names, ranges, and conservation status. Additional sections offer a primer on equipment and conditions for growing the specimens; identify threats to the plants’ natural habitats and the conservation organizations that are working to protect them; and present a survey of Long Island’s native carnivorous plants, making this a valuable horticultural reference as well. This book will appeal to both fine art photography aficionados and horticultural enthusiasts.

Size: 9″ x 12″ | 145 color photos | 144 pp
ISBN13: 9780764350986 | Binding: hard cover

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Matthew M. Kaelin began his lifelong interest in carnivorous plants after viewing the 1986 documentary Deathtrap as well as an onstage production of Little Shop of Horrors. He has been cultivating carnivorous plants since early 2003, dedicating many long days and late nights to their study. His photography has been exhibited in fine art galleries, he has authored natural history articles, won horticultural awards, and named two Nepenthes cultivars. Lecturing often at local conservation organizations, he is also currently involved in a survey of Long Island’s native carnivorous plant populations. Matthew resides in Nassau County on the South Shore of Long Island. In his spare time he can be found at the beach, hiking on the east end of the island, and in New York City. To see more on his work on carnivorous plants, please visit his website at mkaelin.com.