Independent PUBLISHER of books on everything from Architecture to Zuni Jewelry

Amelia’s Picks

Amelia's Picks

Here on the Schiffer Book Farm we have grown accustomed to the changing of the guard amongst our Boston Terrier population. We mark the sadness of George's passing with a joyful announcement that Amelia will now be taking on the role of canine critic. While her brethren are clearly not up to the task (sorry Angus and Elwood) Amelia brings a great spunk and vitality to the role and is sure to provide engaging reflections on our titles after giving them a good read. These are Amelia’s Picks:

Texas Hill Country is famous for it's landscape, rugged limestone peaks, and country roads through grasslands and fields of wildflowers. Perfect for armchair travelers or inspiring your upcoming travels.

More than 100 watercolor paintings created by Eliza Griffin Johnston in the 1840s and 1850s as a birthday present to her Civil War General husband. A treasure from Texas' past!

Pickled Delicacies: In Vinegar, Oil, and Alcohol

Pickled Delicacies: In Vinegar, Oil, and Alcohol

I’m pretty good at getting myself into a pickle, like the time my head got stuck in the screen door, and the time I had to spend the night at the vet after eating an entire bowl of rising bread dough. Hey, somebody put it on the floor beside the fireplace, so I thought it was for me. Now, however, I am eyeing the ginger apples and curry pears pictured in Pickled Delicacies. This book by German authors is filled with unusual, delicious-sounding recipes that make me drool. There are jewel-like jars filled with vinegar, oil, or alcohol-based concoctions such as figs in cardamom syrup, marinated feta cheese with prosciutto, herring in mustard sauce, and porcini mushroom oil. The recipes are short, super-easy, and make colorful holiday gifts. Tempting as they sound, I’d better stay away from the peaches in brandy and quinces in calvados, based on my experience with fermented foods. But oh, how I would love to try them.

Into the Pensieve: The Philosophy and Mythology of Harry Potter

Into the Pensieve: The Philosophy and Mythology of Harry Potter

Most people tend to think that because I'm a dog, I don't have deep thoughts. They think I'm all "food, food" and "squirrel, squirrel" when it comes to my inner monologue. But I assure you that on long sleepy afternoons, I like nothing more than picking on an intellectual bone (pondering such matters as why dog is God spelled backward). Patrick McCauley's Into the Pensieve: The Philosophy and Mythology of Harry Potter had instant appeal to me. I mean, it's a book about Harry Potter—and of course, I've read the whole series and loved it despite my fear of Death Eaters and He Who Must Not Be Named and the fact that wizards seem to prefer owls as pets, which, well, I just don't get. Anyway, this Mr. McCauley has a PhD in philosophical theology and literature, and in this book he dives into all the deeper meanings of things that happen in the books. Reading his work is a little bit like rereading the Harry Potter books—you get to think about all your favorite characters again, but from a new point of view. In short, he really gives Potter fans something good to chew on.