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Japanese Knife Sharpening: With Traditional Waterstones

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Japanese Knife Sharpening: With Traditional Waterstones

Rudolf Dick

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This is the ultimate guide to sharpening with traditional waterstones for all owners of Japanese knives. Provided are step-by-step instructions on proper knife sharpening accompanied by over 120 color photos, plus black and white graphics for clarity. Details on the care for all major blade types are also provided, along with expert advice on the use of solid, abrasive materials, and steel. Important information on care for the waterstones is also provided to keep your sharpening stones useful for many years. Readers learn how to make knives sharp and obtain their very best performance. The expert, Dr. Rudolf Dick, explains special Japanese knives, helps you choose the correct sharpening stones, and provides a detailed guide for sharpening practice. A chapter on the pinnacle of sharpening, polishing Japanese swords, completes the standard work for all users and friends of Japanese knives.

Size: 6″ x 9″ | 151 color & b/w images | 128 pp
ISBN13: 9780764346804 | Binding: spiral bound

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Dr. Ing. Rudolf Dick is a leading expert with respect to Japanese cutting tools. The mechanical engineer was born in 1956, studied at the TU Munich, Germany, and received his doctorate in the special area of transformation techniques. As a longtime CEO of Dick GmbH, Feine Werkzeuge, he always had great interest in the creative interaction of tools, humans and materials.The foundation for this was already laid during childhood in the workshop of his father, who had a small business for producing things needed for musical instruments. During a practical training at the toolshop of the shipyard at Deggendorf, Germany, his enthusiasm was finally ignited while forging and sharpening under the guidance of a master “from old stock”. Later on, multiple visits with bladesmiths and knifemakers in Japan enhanced his understanding of the nature of good cutting tools. Sharpening with waterstones is one example of that striving for perfection which is typical for the way of working of Japanese craftsmen. One of the lasting impressions from this time is the “outdated” work ethics of the traditional Japanese shokunin, whose main focus is on the needs of his customers and not on maximizing the profit.Dr. Dick lives in Deggendorf, Lower Bavaria, where he, in addition to working as a consulting engineer, also tests the described sharpening methods in his own experimental workshop.