Independent PUBLISHER with a book for everyone

M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and Korea

Look Inside!

Look Inside! Look Inside! Look Inside! Look Inside!

M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage in WWII and Korea

David Doyle

Available Now

$19.99

Add to Cart

The M40 Gun Motor Carriage and M43 Howitzer Motor Carriage are featured in over 200 photographs, providing a detailed study of the conception, development, testing, and combat use of these key vehicles. As the US entered WWII, the nation lacked heavy self-propelled artillery, instead relying heavily on towed artillery, much of it WWI-surplus. Only 100 examples of the nation’s first heavy self-propelled gun, the M12, were built. Finding favor once deployed, attention was turned to developing an improved model. Initially designated the T83, and later as the M40, the new 155mm Gun Motor Carriage was first fielded in the closing months of WWII. Already scheduled for mass production, the M40, and its companion 8-inch howitzer-armed M43, continued to see extensive use during the Korean War, providing crucial support to infantry and armor formations. Historic period images, as well as, meticulously photographed surviving examples, provide a detailed look at this important piece of US military hardware. Part of the Legends of Warfare series.

Size: 9″ x 9″ | 209 color and b/w photos | 112 pp
ISBN13: 9780764354021 | Binding: hard cover

Back

David Doyle’s earliest published works appeared in periodicals aimed at the historic military vehicle restoration hobby. This was a natural outlet for the collector, whose collection includes ten Vietnam-era vehicles. By 1999, this included regular features in leading hobby publications, appearing regularly in US, English, and Polish magazines. Since 2003, over 100 of his books have been published. While some concern aircraft and warships, volumes on military vehicles, meticulously researched by David and his wife Denise, remain the genre for which he is most recognized. This recognition peaked in 2015, when he was presented the coveted Bart Vanderveen Award by the Military Vehicle Preservation Association, given in recognition of, “… the individual who has contributed the most to the historic preservation of military vehicles worldwide.”